Media

We invite you to read these Media reviews by teen writers for current and recent issues of KidSpirit Magazine, and welcome teen writers and readers around the world to submit their reviews to us!

Interstellar: A Glimpse of the Future

by Chase Frey

Director Christopher Nolan brings a passionate, action-filled film to theaters. Interstellar chronicles the story of a retired astronaut on a difficult, seemingly endless quest to save the human race, leading him to difficult times and strange worlds. Set in the future, a character called Cooper (Matthew McConaughey) is a retired astronaut. He works on a

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A Review of The Omnivore’s Dilemma

by Skyler Sallick

Close your eyes and envision what you ate for your last meal: whether cornflakes for breakfast, a turkey sandwich and chicken soup for lunch, or a juicy cheeseburger for dinner. Now try to pinpoint the starting locations of each aspect of the food you consumed. Challenging, isn’t it? Uncertainty about where our food comes from

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A Review of The Book Thief

by Gertie-Pearl Zwick-Schachter

The Book Thief stole two hours of my life. Markus Zusak’s popular young-adult novel was adapted as a movie in 2013. Unfortunately, it fell a little flat for this reviewer. The plot involves a young girl, brought by her fleeing mother to a foster family in Germany, where she falls in love with books. Although

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A Review of the Movie Spellbound

by Daisy Cohen

Sweaty hands, dry throat, pounding heart: these are the classic symptoms experienced by a Scripps National Spelling Bee competitor. Each competitor is reaching for that title — Spelling Bee Champion — while knowing that just one misused letter means their dreams will come tumbling down. Jeffrey Blitz’s 2002 documentary, Spellbound, follows eight pre-teens on an expedition

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Movie Review: Surviving Progress

by Maya Mesh

Imagine a world with burned forests, little drinkable water, and air so polluted it is unsafe to breathe. We only have one earth. If we continue the way we are going, this is the “progress” that we have created. This doesn’t seem like progress at all, does it? Since the Industrial Revolution, humans have progressed

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Flavor of India: A Review of The Village by the Sea

by Tanmaya Murthy

The Village by the Sea, an award-winning novel by the prolific Indian author Anita Desai, is a heartwarming, life-enriching story. Written with a simple sensibility, the novel offers readers a glimpse into the complexities faced by an impoverished family in a small Indian village. This ingenious, inspiring work of fiction has touched the hearts of millions,

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Staying Alive: A Review of the Hunger Games

by William Lohier

After I first saw The Hunger Games movie, adapted from the novel by Suzanne Collins, I could only describe it as “awesome!”  I watched the movie a few years ago with my friends and dad. On the way home all we could talk about was our favorite death. Mine was probably the multiple stabbings, shootings,

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Believing in Da Vinci’s Code

by Rachael Wang

The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown is a fantastic mystery-thriller. It is a reflection on the darkness of human nature, depicting lies and betrayals, political power struggles, selfish actions fueled by pride and fear, and murder. But it is also a reflection on joy. Throughout the novel, the values of trust, family, and loyalty are strongly

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Heard Without a Voice

by Zeeshan Hassan-Andoh

Autism is a huge mystery. For several decades, scientists have been trying to understand the autistic mind. Parents of autistic children have written about their own experiences in the hope of helping others. Then there is the occasional book written by a person with autism, such as The Autistic Brain by Temple Grandin who has Asperger’s

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A Review of Wonder

by Vanita Sharma

There are kids in my middle school, like in every school, that just don’t fit in with the crowd. Some are disabled. Some have a mental disorder or a facial disfigurement. They are hidden among the other children at school, camouflaged and unnoticed. Students don’t bully kids who are different at school, but no one

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